How to Speak Balinese

Good morning: Selamat pagi
Good mid-day: Selamat siang
Good evening: Selamat malam
Good-bye: Selamat tinggal (if you’re leaving)/Selamat jalan (someone is leaving you)
Yes: Ya
No: Tidak
Thank you: Terima kasi
You’re welcome: Kembali or sama-sama
How are you?: Apa kabar?
What is this / that?: Apa?
Very good: Baik juga!
Please: Silakan
One more: Satu lagi
Finished: Habis
Bill, please: Minta bon
Excuse me: Permisi or ma’af
Doesn’t matter: Tidak apa-apa
(Note: letter ‘c’ pronounced as ‘ch’)
Do you speak English: Bisa bicara Bahasa Inggris?
I don’t speak Indonesian: Saya tidak bisa bicara bahasa Indonesia.
I don’t understand: Saya tidak mengerti.
Where are you from?: Dari mana?
I am from America: Saya dari Amerika.
How long have you been in Bali?: Sudah lama di Bali sini?
I have been in Bali for…: Saya sudah di Bali…..
What is your name?: Siapa nama anda?
My name is….: Nama saya……..
What time is it?: Jam berapa?
Where are you going?: Ke mana?
Turn left / right / straight / stop: Belok kiri / belok kanan / terus / stop
Where is the bathroom?: Di mana kamar kecil?
Where…?: Di mana?
toko = shop
kamar saya = my room
WC (way-say) = toilet
kamar mandi = bathroom
Currency / Exchange Rate: $1 US dollar = 8,675 IDR (Indonesian Rupiah)
Can you help me?: Bisa bantu saya?
I want…: Saya mau…
I want this: Saya mau ini.
I would like: Saya minta
I don’t want it: Saya tidak mau
Do you have?: Ada?
I like: Saya suka
How much?: Berapa harga?

 

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Balinese Etiquette

Daily Etiquette
1.     Body language: it is rude to point with the index finger.  Use, instead, your thumb and always your right hand (left is seen as impure).  The head is seen as sacred, so avoid patting children’s heads, and refrain from displaying the bottoms of your feet (also seen as impure).  Talking with your hands on your hips is a sign of contempt, anger or aggression.
2.     Hospitality: handshaking is customary for greetings (again, use only the right hand).  A common method when greeting in passing is to press your palm to your friend’s palm in front of your chests, fingers point upwards.
3.     Visitors: are always welcomed with refreshments, but refrain from eating or drinking until host says ‘silakan’ (please begin).  When eating with hands, first wash hands, then use right hand only.  Sandals and shoes may be left outside the entrance the home. 
4.     What to Wear: When visiting rural villages, skimpy attire is not considered appropriate. Cover your shoulders, do not wear short shorts, cover your knees.
5.     Bargaining: in a Balinese market, haggling over price is not considered impolite, but be pleasant.  Bali is not one of those places where making an agitated display of negotiations is considered part of the process.  Smile, and insist on the price you want to pay, and if they refuse your price, smile, say ‘thank you’ (terima kasi) and walk away.
6.     Shoes:  You will always remove your shoes before entering any store or restaurant. This is customary for all.

Temple Etiquette
For BOTH men and women, when entering a temple, you MUST wear a sarong around the waist and sometimes a sash is also required.
WOMEN ONLY – you must cover your shoulders and your knees.
Please ask permission before taking pictures.
Please avoid pointing the soles of the feet towards the shrines if sitting on the ground.
And when in doubt just in case you find yourself not knowing the etiquette learn how to say ‘ma’af sekali’ (very sorry).
Women on their cycle are not allowed in the temple, nor are women who have recently given birth

Names
Basically, the Balinese only have four first names:
First child: Wayan or Putu
Second child: Made or Kadek
Third child: Nyoman or Koman
Fourth child: Ketut
Fifth child: Start over with Wayan or Putu, and so on….
So don’t get confused if you feel like everyone you meet has the same name!

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Mount Agung: Bali's Home of the Gods

Mount Agung is an active stratovolcano (meaning layered with ash and lava) and is the highest point in Bali and has great spiritual significance in Bali. The volcano has been respected and feared because of its violent eruptions for hundreds of years.  Balinese believe that Mount Agung itself is a fragment of its sister mountain Meru, brought by the first hindus to come to Bali.

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 The Balinese believe their island is a sacred place that the gods have made their home, and they were put there to take good care of it. After all, Bali’s incredible landscape proves a hospitable home for divine beings.

One of the main attractions of Mount Agung is seeing the beautiful Mother Temple, or Pura Besakih. The temple is actually over 20 temples and shrines for visitors to respectfully experience. Always ask your guides or the locals if the temple is open, as it is closed to visitors many days a year for rituals and days of prayer. Hindus believe it is the center of the spiritual universe, affecting all things physical and metaphysical. The belief was reinforced during the 1963 eruption, which wiped out villages and killed many people, but miraculously spared the Mother Temple of Besakih built on the side of Mount Agung. The hike to the summit of Mount Agung is challenging but absolutely worthy of your efforts. Seeing the sunrise above the clouds of Bali in the home of the gods is a truly unforgettable experience!

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See the splendor of Mount Agung yourself, join us in Bali October 3-10 2015!